Ars Technica Comments Disabled: Why We’re Making The Change

0
99
ars technica comments disabled
ars technica comments disabled

Ars Technica is proud to announce that we are making a change to our commenting system. Starting today, we will be disabling comments on all stories. This decision was made after careful consideration and after consulting with our readers and other media organizations. We believe that this change will improve the quality of our content and the conversation around it.We know that this decision will be controversial, and we want to explain why we believe it is the right one.

Ars Technica is a site that covers technology and the people who create it.

We are passionate about our topic and want to ensure that our coverage is the best it can be. We believe that comments on our stories add an important dimension to the conversation. However, we have found that comments on our stories can be disruptive, negative, and unproductive.We have seen a number of cases where comments have created a negative environment for our journalists and our readers. We have also seen cases where comments have gone beyond criticism and into personal attacks. We want our readers to be able to engage with us on our stories in a constructive way, and we believe that disabling comments will help us achieve that goal.We understand that this decision may be unpopular, but

1) Ars Technica Comments Disabled: Why We’re Making the Change

As many of you may have noticed, we have disabled comments on Ars Technica. This was not a decision that we made lightly, but we feel that it is in the best interest of the site and our community.

We have always been a site that relies heavily on reader interaction and feedback.

Whether it’s in the comments, on social media, or in person at events, we love hearing from you. The feedback helps us make Ars better—it’s how we learn what you like, what you don’t like, and where we can improve.

However, over the past few years, we’ve seen the tone of the comments on Ars change. They’ve become less constructive, more hostile, and more trollish. While we’ve tried various solutions to address this, none of them have been completely effective.

We want Ars to be a place where people can have civil,

Informative discussions about the things they’re passionate about. But the current state of the comments is preventing that from happening.

So, after much discussion, we’ve decided to disable comments on the site. We’re not ruling out the possibility of re-enabling them in the future, but for now, we want to focus on other ways to encourage reader interaction.

We’ll still be interacting with our community in all the other ways we always have.

You can reach us on social media, and we’ll be hosting more events and meetups around the country. We’re also working on some new projects that we hope will create even more opportunities for reader interaction.

We know this isn’t the news that some of you were hoping for, but we believe it’s the best decision for Ars Technica. We’re grateful for all of your feedback, and we hope you’ll continue to interact with us in all the other ways that you do.

2) The Importance of Feedback

As many of you have noticed, we have disabled comments on Ars Technica. This was not a decision that we made lightly, but ultimately we felt that it was in the best interest of the site and our community.

There are a few reasons why we decided to disable comments.

First and foremost, we want to create a more positive and constructive environment for discussion. Too often, comments devolve into personal attacks, name-calling, and other unproductive behavior. Secondly, we want to focus on creating original content, and we believe that the time and energy spent moderating comments would be better spent elsewhere.

We understand that this decision will not be popular with everyone, but we believe it is the right one for Ars Technica. We hope that you will continue to visit the site and participate in the discussion in other ways, such as our forums or social media. Thank you for your understanding.

3) The Problem With Comments

Ars Technica recently announced that they would be disabling comments on their website. This decision was made in response to the overwhelming negative feedback that the site received in regards to the quality of their comments section.

The problem with comments is that they are often used as a platform for trolls and spammers to attack other users or to promote their own agendas. This can result in an overall deterioration of the quality of the comments section, which in turn drives away potential readers.

There are a few ways to combat this problem,

such as moderating comments or requiring users to register before they can comment, but these solutions are not perfect. Moderating comments can be time-consuming and is often not effective at stopping trolls and spammers. Requiring users to register before they can comment may deter some potential commenters from participating.

In the end, the best solution may be to simply disable comments altogether. This may seem like a drastic measure, but it may be the best way to ensure that the quality of the comments section remains high.

4) The Solution: A New Approach

At Ars Technica, we’re always looking for ways to improve the experience for our readers. Recently, we’ve been discussing changes to the way we handle comments on the site. After careful consideration, we’ve decided to disable comments on all articles going forward.

We believe that this change will result in a more positive experience for everyone involved. We’re making this change in an effort to create a more respectful and constructive environment for all of our readers.

We understand that not everyone will agree with this decision, but we hope that you’ll understand our reasoning and respect our decision. Thank you for being part of the Ars Technica community.

5) Implementing the Change

Last week, we announced that we would be disabling comments on Ars Technica. This was not a decision that we made lightly, and we want to take a moment to explain our thinking.

First and foremost, we want to make sure that our readers have a safe and enjoyable experience on our site. Unfortunately, the comments section has become increasingly toxic, and we believe that it is no longer serving our readers or our community in the way that it should.

We want to create a space where our readers can have thoughtful and respectful conversations about the stories that we publish. We believe that this is best done without comments.

Of course, we understand that there are many who will disagree with this decision. We respect your opinion, and we hope that you will continue to visit Ars Technica and participate in our community in other ways.

6) The Results

We’re making a change to Ars Technica today: we’re disabling comments on all of our articles. This was a difficult decision for us to make, but we believe it’s the right one.

The internet is a wonderful place for many things. It’s a great place to find information, to connect with friends and family, and to debate the merits of your favorite TV show. But it’s also a place where people can be needlessly cruel to one another.

We’ve seen this firsthand in the comments on our own site. We moderate our comments diligently, but there are always a few that slip through the cracks. And even when the comments are civil, they can often add very little to the conversation.

We believe that there are other,

Better ways to have a productive discussion about the articles we publish. We encourage you to join us on our forums, where we have lively discussions about the latest news and reviews. We also have a vibrant social media presence, and we encourage you to engage with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.

We understand that some of you will be disappointed by this decision. We’re sorry for that, but we hope you’ll understand our reasoning. Thank you for being a part of the Ars community.

Previous articleHow To Motivate Yourself to Work Out
Next articleThe Best Chainsaw Man Cosplay Of All Time

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here